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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Timing Device Assemblers and Adjusters *
 
Timing Device Assemblers and Adjusters
(O*NET 51-2093.00, SOC 51-2093)
What they do
Perform precision assembling, adjusting, or calibrating, within narrow tolerances, of timing devices such as digital clocks or timing devices with electrical or electronic components.
 
Also called:
Calibration Specialist, Calibrator, Clockmaker, Horologist, Time Stamp Assembler, Watch Technician, Watchmaker
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Mechanical
    Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics
    Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Repairing
    Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Quality Control Analysis
    Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Troubleshooting
    Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility
    Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
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Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    1 to 12 months on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  4%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  2%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  91%
Less than high school diploma   2%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Finger Dexterity
    The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Manual Dexterity
    The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
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Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment
    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
    Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Repair precision devices or workpieces.
  • Align parts or workpieces to ensure proper assembly.
  • Assemble metal or plastic parts or products.
  • Inspect timing devices.
  • Disassemble equipment for maintenance or repair.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Assemble and install components of timepieces to complete mechanisms, using watchmakers' tools and loupes.
  • Observe operation of timepiece parts and subassemblies to determine accuracy of movement, and to diagnose causes of defects.
  • Test operation and fit of timepiece parts and subassemblies, using electronic testing equipment, tweezers, watchmakers' tools, and loupes.
  • Replace specified parts to repair malfunctioning timepieces, using watchmakers' tools, loupes, and holding fixtures.
  • Disassemble timepieces such as watches, clocks, and chronometers so that repairs can be made.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor