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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Jewelers *
 
Jewelers
(O*NET 51-9071.01, SOC 51-9071)
What they do
Fabricate and repair jewelry articles. Make models or molds to create jewelry items.
 
Also called:
Bench Jeweler, Earrings Fabricator, Gemologist, Goldsmith, Jeweler
 
 
Wages
Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers*
Vermont - 2018
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 11.80   $24,540  
25% $ 14.56   $30,290  
Median $ 17.57   $36,540  
75% $ 23.14   $48,120  
90% $ 29.98   $62,370  
 
Average $ 19.24   $40,010  
* You're seeing information for "Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers" because it includes "Jewelers" for which information is not available.
1 What are Percentile Wages?
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers*
United States - 2016
IndustryPercent of total
  • Clothing and clothing accessories stores
30%
  • Self-employed workers, all industries
30%
  • Miscellaneous manufacturing
21%
  • Merchant wholesalers, durable goods
9%
  • Repair and maintenance
3%
* You're seeing information for "Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers" because it includes "Jewelers" for which there is no information.
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Customer and Personal Service
    Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Design
    Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Production and Processing
    Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Sales and Marketing
    Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Judgment and Decision Making
    Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Operations Analysis
    Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Time Management
    Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Complex Problem Solving
    Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Artistic
    Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Innovation
    Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Analytical Thinking
    Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers*
 Vermont
2016 employment 428
2026 employment 388
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-1.0%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
38
* You're seeing information for "Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers" because it includes "Jewelers" for which there is no information.
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers*
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    More than 1 year on-the-job training
* You're seeing information for "Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers" because it includes "Jewelers" for which there is no information.
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Medium Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (6.0 to < 7.0) - A typical worker will require over 1 year up to and including 2 years of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   4%
Associate's degree   4%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  42%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  33%
Less than high school diploma   17%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Finger Dexterity
    The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Manual Dexterity
    The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Control Precision
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Thinking Creatively
    Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
    Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information
    Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
    Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Polish materials, workpieces, or finished products.
  • Smooth metal surfaces or edges.
  • Align parts or workpieces to ensure proper assembly.
  • Design jewelry or decorative objects.
  • Repair precision devices or workpieces.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Smooth soldered joints and rough spots, using hand files and emery paper, and polish smoothed areas with polishing wheels or buffing wire.
  • Position stones and metal pieces, and set, mount, and secure items in place, using setting and hand tools.
  • Create jewelry from materials such as gold, silver, platinum, and precious or semiprecious stones.
  • Make repairs, such as enlarging or reducing ring sizes, soldering pieces of jewelry together, and replacing broken clasps and mountings.
  • Clean and polish metal items and jewelry pieces, using jewelers' tools, polishing wheels, and chemical baths.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor