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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic *
 
Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
(O*NET 51-4035.00, SOC 51-4035)
What they do
Set up, operate, or tend milling or planing machines to mill, plane, shape, groove, or profile metal or plastic work pieces.
 
Also called:
Machine Operator, Mill Operator, Miller, Milling Operator, Set Up Person
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2018
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 13.33   $27,720  
25% $ 15.19   $31,600  
Median $ 18.26   $37,990  
75% $ 22.16   $46,100  
90% $ 24.57   $51,110  
 
Average $ 18.54   $38,560  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2016
IndustryPercent of total
  • Fabricated metal product manufacturing
31%
  • Machinery manufacturing
21%
  • Primary metal manufacturing
13%
  • Transportation equipment manufacturing
8%
  • Plastics and rubber products manufacturing
6%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Production and Processing
    Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Mechanical
    Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics
    Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Operation and Control
    Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Self Control
    Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Initiative
    Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2016 employment 75
2026 employment 56
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-2.9%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
4
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    1 to 12 months on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   4%
Associate's degree   2%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  27%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  50%
Less than high school diploma   16%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Manual Dexterity
    The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Control Precision
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Finger Dexterity
    The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
    Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships
    Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Mount materials or workpieces onto production equipment.
  • Remove products or workpieces from production equipment.
  • Align parts or workpieces to ensure proper assembly.
  • Feed materials or products into or through equipment.
  • Monitor equipment operation to ensure that products are not flawed.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Position and secure workpieces on machines, using holding devices, measuring instruments, hand tools, and hoists.
  • Remove workpieces from machines, and check to ensure that they conform to specifications, using measuring instruments such as microscopes, gauges, calipers, and micrometers.
  • Verify alignment of workpieces on machines, using measuring instruments such as rules, gauges, or calipers.
  • Move cutters or material manually or by turning handwheels, or engage automatic feeding mechanisms to mill workpieces to specifications.
  • Observe milling or planing machine operation, and adjust controls to ensure conformance with specified tolerances.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor