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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Printing Press Operators *
 
Printing Press Operators
(O*NET 51-5112.00, SOC 51-5112)
What they do
Set up and operate digital, letterpress, lithographic, flexographic, gravure, or other printing machines. Includes short-run offset printing presses.
 
Also called:
1st Pressman, 2nd Pressman, Flexographic Press Operator, Offset Pressman, Press Leader, Press Operator, Pressman, Printer, Printing Press Operator, Printing Pressman
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2018
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 14.62   $30,420  
25% $ 16.53   $34,380  
Median $ 18.93   $39,370  
75% $ 22.72   $47,250  
90% $ 25.34   $52,700  
 
Average $ 19.51   $40,570  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2016
IndustryPercent of total
  • Printing and related support activities
56%
  • Paper manufacturing
7%
  • Publishing industries (except Internet)
7%
  • Self-employed workers, all industries
5%
  • Advertising, public relations, and related services
4%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Mechanical
    Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Quality Control Analysis
    Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Persistence
    Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Stress Tolerance
    Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2016 employment 332
2026 employment 322
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-0.3%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
33
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    1 to 12 months on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Medium Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (6.0 to < 7.0) - A typical worker will require over 1 year up to and including 2 years of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  22%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  71%
Less than high school diploma   7%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Information Ordering
    The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Visual Color Discrimination
    The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
    Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
    Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Inspected printed materials or other images to verify quality.
  • Collect samples of materials or products for testing.
  • Read work orders or other instructions to determine product specifications or materials requirements.
  • Review blueprints or other instructions to determine operational methods or sequences.
  • Evaluate quality of materials or products.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Collect and inspect random samples during print runs to identify any necessary adjustments.
  • Examine job orders to determine quantities to be printed, stock specifications, colors, or special printing instructions.
  • Verify that paper and ink meet the specifications for a given job.
  • Start presses and pull proofs to check for ink coverage and density, alignment, and registration.
  • Change press plates, blankets, or cylinders, as required.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor