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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Textile Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders *
 
Textile Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
(O*NET 51-6063.00, SOC 51-6063)
What they do
Set up, operate, or tend machines that knit, loop, weave, or draw in textiles.
 
Also called:
Knitter, Knitting Machine Operator, Loom Fixer, Tufting Machine Operator, Warp Knit Operator, Weaver, Winder Operator
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Textile mills
66%
  • Apparel manufacturing
13%
  • Textile product mills
13%
  • Self-employed workers
3%
  • Administrative and support services
3%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Administration and Management
    Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Production and Processing
    Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Operation and Control
    Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Persistence
    Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Self Control
    Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Short-term on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  2%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   5%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  0%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  66%
Less than high school diploma   27%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Control Precision
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Finger Dexterity
    The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Multilimb Coordination
    The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Manual Dexterity
    The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
    Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Performing General Physical Activities
    Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings
    Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Cut fabrics.
  • Inspect textile products.
  • Feed materials or products into or through equipment.
  • Inspect production equipment.
  • Notify others of equipment repair or maintenance needs.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Remove defects in cloth by cutting and pulling out filling.
  • Inspect products to ensure that specifications are met and to determine if machines need adjustment.
  • Observe woven cloth to detect weaving defects.
  • Thread yarn, thread, and fabric through guides, needles, and rollers of machines for weaving, knitting, or other processing.
  • Examine looms to determine causes of loom stoppage, such as warp filling, harness breaks, or mechanical defects.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor